Tue. Aug 20th, 2019

New frontier found for preventing the spread of germs

preventing the spread of germs

Since ages, hospitals have been finding ways to prevent transmission of germs and encouraging nurses, and doctors to wash their hands properly. However, a new study revealed the need for expanding these efforts to the patients as well.

The research discovered that out of the 399 hospital patients 14 percent were found to have ‘superbug’ bacteria on their nostrils or hands during their stay at the hospital. The epidemiologist & leader of the research, Lona Mody stated: “Hand hygiene narrative has largely focused on physicians, nurses and other frontline staff, and all the policies and performance measurements have centered on them, and rightfully so. But our findings make an argument for addressing transmission of MDROs in a way that involves patients, too.”

She told that some patients do not directly arrive at the hospital room instead get tests through other areas as well, this must be considered while studying the ecology of MDROs in those places too.

Co-lead author, Doctor Katherine Reyes said: “This study highlights the importance of hand-washing and environmental cleaning, especially within a healthcare setting where patients’ immune systems are compromised. This step is crucial not only for healthcare providers but also for patients and their families. Germs are on our hands; you do not need to see to believe it. And they travel. When these germs are not washed off, they pass easily from person to person and objects to person and make people sick.”

Mody further added: “Infection prevention is everybody’s business. We are all in this together. No matter where you are, in a healthcare environment or not, this study is a good reminder to clean your hands often, using good techniques–especially before and after preparing food, before eating food, after using a toilet, and before and after caring for someone who is sick– to protect yourself and others.”